Amy Alexander works at the University of California at Los Angeles, raising money for its alumni-supported Annual Fund. After a bad experience at an inaccessible college in New York, Alexander plans to return to school at UCLA, which landed the No. 7 spot on our survey.

Amy Alexander works at the University of California at Los Angeles, raising money for its alumni-supported Annual Fund. After a bad experience at an inaccessible college in New York, Alexander plans to return to school at UCLA, which landed the No. 7 spot on our survey.

If you’ve got a disability, choosing a college means thinking about a lot more than just academic facilities and social amenities. This may be your first opportunity to live independently. Will the support you need to live on your own be available? Personal assistance services? Accessible classrooms, transportation and living quarters? Adaptive sports? Will you be able to participate fully in campus life?

Although we couldn’t rate every university in the country, we’ve tried to provide you with a baseline to start from. The schools we chose to describe may not be ideal for you, but they will show you what to look for.

Last winter, New Mobility sent a questionnaire to disability resource office (DRO) directors a